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Conserving Water Is Always In Season

Monsoon or drought, there’s an ideal watering schedule that not only benefits your landscape, but also your wallet.

We may be out of Stage 2 and Stage 1 watering rules, but that does not mean we should return to watering our landscapes several days a week and washing patios and driveways.

Thanks to plentiful rain in May, things are a little greener than usual heading into the dog days of summer — including our lawns. But if you are tempted to water more often to keep that lush, emerald turf from withering in the summer heat, keep this in mind: If you do, your next water bill will likely be a real soaker.

There’s an ideal watering schedule that not only benefits your landscape, but also your wallet and the environment.

Here’s how it works.

Lawns

  • Once a week from April to October in the absence of recent rainfall.
  • Once a month from November to March in the absence of recent rainfall.
  • Use the Holiday Method to determine which day of the month.

Woody perennials and shrubs

  • Twice a month from April to October in the absence of recent rainfall.
  • Twice during the dormant season (November to February)
  • Use the Holiday Method to determine which two times.

Trees

  • Once a month from April to October in the absence of recent rainfall.
  • Once during the dormant season (November to February)

Notice the repeat phrase “in the absence of recent rainfall.” Right now, thanks to plentiful rain over the last month, there’s enough moisture in the soil to forgo any supplemental watering for the next four or more weeks for lawns, and probably enough for woody perennials for the next six to eight weeks.

So minimize the impact on your wallet and help preserve native water resources. Stick to the recommended watering schedule and water only when your landscape absolutely needs it.

Mark Peterson
Mark Peterson
Mark A. Peterson is a conservation project coordinator for San Antonio Water System. With over 30 years of experience as an urban forester and arborist, Mark is probably the only person you know who actually prunes trees for fun. When not expounding on the benefits of trees and limited lawns, you’re likely to find him hiking San Antonio’s wilderness parks or expounding on the virtues of geography and history to his friends.
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